The College Of Witchcraft And Wizardy In Poland Is Accepting Muggles (Not Kidding)

Who said wizardry was just a fairytale?

  • Are you a fan of Harry Potter? Wished if there were only a place where you could pursue your dreams of being a wizard? Well, now you can...

    • For those of us who didn't get Hogwarts acceptance letters on our 11th birthdays, here's another chance. At the Czocha College of Witchcraft and Wizardry in Poland, you can recreate the magic of Hogwarts and the Harry Potter universe — if you're over 18, that is.

      mashable.com
    • The one regret of fans of JK Rowling's beloved Harry Potter universe is that its Muggle readers cannot attend Hogwarts, but now there is a solution – if you can wait until you are 18.

      telegraph.co.uk
  • Deep in the Polish castle called Czocha lies the College Of Wizardry, a four-day immersive experience for live-action role play, better known as LARP

    • The College of Wizardry, a LARP (live-action role play) event at the picturesque Polish castle Czocha, brought more than 190 fans of J.K. Rowling's magical novels together for a four-day immersive experience last month.

      usatoday.com
  • For just RM1,200 (USD345), muggles will be given accommodation and food and the necessary outfits in order to look the part. After all, you're now a full-fledged wizard.

    • Price
      280€. The price includes food and lodging at the castle from dinner Thursday to breakfast Sunday.

      We will provide you with the following
      A basic wizard robe
      A study book
      A tie in your House colour
      All these items must be returned after the larp, unless you want to buy them as souvenirs.

      wix.com
    • For 280 euros (£220), students are provided with lodging and meals, as well as robes, a house tie, and their college books while they are studying, and are encouraged to pursue emotional relationships, whether they be friendships, or bitter rivalries like that of Harry and Draco Malfoy.

      telegraph.co.uk
  • Not only that, you will also be split into different houses namely Durentius, Faust, Libussa, Molin, and Sendivogius, just like how students were separated in the Harry Potter series. Are you excited yet?

    • In this post-Hogwarts college, everyone gets sorted into one of five houses: Durentius, Faust, Libussa, Molin and Sendivogius.

      mashable.com
    • As at Hogwarts, the houses are named after people with strong associations to magic: Durentius stems from Faust's Polish equivalent Pan Twardowski, also known as Laurentius Dhur.
      Sendivogius is inspired by Michał Sędziwój, a Polish alchemist. Libussa is named after Libuše, a soothsayer, and ancestor of the Czech people, while Molin may refer to Raffaele Molin, the Italian zoologist.

      telegraph.co.uk
  • You even get to choose what field you want to study in. From fighting the dark arts to pursuing to be a healer, the path you want to forge is entirely up to you!

    • The first four-day event in November sold out in two days and saw 190 people from 11 countries join together to create the English-language College, where students could pursue one of five areas of study: fighting the dark arts as aurors or curse-breakers; training as a healer; working with magical animals as a magizoologist; or studying the unspeakables, which bear no further comment.

      telegraph.co.uk
    • There are three years of students at Czocha College of Wizardry; Juniors, Sophomores and Seniors. All three have their own special part in the school hierarchy. There are also the five study Paths; Aurors, Curse Breakers, Healers, Magizoologists and last, but not least, the Unspeakables. These determine which classes a student has, and with whom.

      wix.com
  • In their official website, the Czocha College is listed as "one of the many colleges students of Hogwarts go to after completing their education."

    • Raasted says it all began with the fairytale location. At an international LARP convention, a colleague brought up that the historic Polish castle could be rented at an affordable fee. Then, rather than creating Hogwarts, the magical school where much of Rowling's seven-book saga takes place, organizers decided to invent a new school for people after Hogwarts, called the College of Wizardry.

      usatoday.com
    • Everyone knows of the famous Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, where students study magic for seven years. It's a little less well known that when wizards have passed their N.E.W.Ts at the end of the seventh year, some of them go on to study at even higher schools of magic - the magical Colleges. One of these is the Czocha College of Witchcraft and Wizardry, which lies hidden in the forests of Poland. Here, the students undergo a further three years of training, until they finally take their S.P.E.L.Ls (Senior Protective Enchanter's Lifelong License). At this college many young girls and boys have turned into men and women, ready for the life of witchcraft and wizardry that they are destined for.

      wix.com
  • Should you decide against participating as a student, there are other positions to be filled as well, such as the groundskeeper or even as a lecturer

    • There are also a number of staff roles up for grabs - including the professors, the groundskeeper and the janitors. The professors will be expected to lecture, the groundskeeper is responsible for the woods around the castle and the janitors run the school, they are the law and their word is final.

      dailymail.co.uk
  • Watch bits and pieces of what you can expect in this magical school here:

  • Don't worry, there will be another event happening next year in April. You can find the details and register for it here

    • The next event will be on April 9-12 at Czocha Castle, and registration is on Dec. 11. But for those unable to travel to Poland, you have options.

      usatoday.com
    • Wizards aged 18 or over, take note: registration for the next edition of The College of Wizardry, on April 16–19 2015, opens on December 11 at 8pm CET, while a sequel to November's event runs between April 9–12.

      telegraph.co.uk
  • Other Harry Potter stories on SAYS:

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