Perkasa Wants Students To Learn This New Subject On The Malaysian Constitution

"If possible, let this subject be taught at the lower secondary level and later be extended to a higher level."

  • Malay rights NGO, Perkasa, wants a subject on the fundamentals of the constitution to be taught in schools and local universities

    • Speaking to reporters, Perkasa president Ibrahim Ali, said that the subject, 'Asas Perlembagaan', would help students better understand the country's history and constitution, as reported by Bernama recently.

      He also said that the new subject is important as it can teach students to respect and understand the special rights and privileges of the Malays and Bumiputera, as stipulated in the Malaysian constitution.

  • "This is important as many people, particularly the youngsters, often mention about the privileges of the Malays (and bumiputera) but a number of them are not aware what constitutes such privileges."

    • Ibrahim Ali believes that a better understanding of the provision about Malay and Bumiputera rights in the constitution, would avoid any unnecessary arguments about the privileges and priorities given to Malays and Islam, which is the official religion of Malaysia.

      "If possible, let this subject be taught at the lower secondary level and later be extended to a higher level," added Ibrahim Ali, suggesting that Asas Perlembagaan can be absorbed into the History subject in schools and be taught as a standalone subject in tertiary education institutions.

      According to[Malay daily Utusan, he also said that civil servants and the public should be educated on matters of the constitution.

  • Ibrahim Ali is referring one of the most controversial articles in the Malaysian constitution, Article 153, which grants the Yang di-Pertuan Agong the responsibility to safeguard the special position of the Malays and natives Sabah and Sarawak

    • 'Article 153: Reservation of quotas in respect of services, permits, etc., for Malays and natives of any of the States of Sabah and Sarawak' says that, "the Yang di-Pertuan Agong shall exercise his functions under this Constitution and federal law in such manner as may be necessary to safeguard the special position of the Malays and natives of any of the States of Sabah and Sarawak and to ensure the reservation for Malays and natives of any of the States of Sabah and Sarawak of such proportion as he may deem reasonable of positions in the public service (other than the public service of a State) and of scholarships, exhibitions and other similar educational or training privileges or special facilities given or accorded by the Federal Government and, when any permit or licence for the operation of any trade or business is required by federal law, then, subject to the provisions of that law and this Article, of such permits and licences."

      However, the same article also states that it does not derogate from the provisions of 'Article 136: Impartial treatment of federal employees', which basically says that people, regardless of their race, who are in the same grade in the service of the Federation, must be treated impartially, subject to the terms and conditions of their employment.

      Article 153 is one of the most heavily discussed provision in the constitution, but Article 10 (4) of the Constitution which guarantees Malaysians freedom of speech also permits the Parliament to prohibit the questioning of Article 153.

  • What do you think about Ibrahim Ali's suggestion? Let us know in the comment section below.

  • Just a few weeks ago, the Perkasa president urged local Malays to boycott establishments that are pro-LGBT:

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