lifestyle

Here's Why Porn Isn't The Best Place You Should Turn To For Sex Education

It may serve as entertainment, but porn is not a reliable form of sex ed.

Cover image via @womanizer (Unsplash) & @lucasdixsept (Unsplash)

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Do you remember the first time you were curious about sex?

The truth is, Malaysians may not have the best knowledge when it comes to sexual education, since sex is widely seen as a taboo topic. But that shouldn't be the case because sex is a completely healthy and natural part of life.

If you have open, honest communication with your parents, you may have had the talk with them because you felt safe enough to ask questions about sex.

If not, your first exposure to sex was probably through porn, or perhaps friends who likely learned everything they knew about sex from it. 

It's safe to say, porn isn't the best place anyone should turn to if they're looking to learn about sex, health, and their bodies. Here's why:

1. It has the tendency to downplay the importance of safe sex

Safe sex is good sex. However, safe practices, like putting on and using a condom, is rarely shown in porn.

According to the World Health Organization, the number of STI cases is rising globally. One effective way of preventing STIs is, of course, through condoms.

Condoms are also great for preventing unwanted pregnancies 98% of the time when used correctly. So, when your only resource for anything sex ed-related is from porn, the message that condoms are safe and necessary may not hit home hard enough to warrant their usage in real life.

2. It often depicts unrealistic expectations of sex

While porn can be used as fun inspiration for couples, as well as trying out new positions in bed, it's important to remember that porn is fantasy.

The overconsumption of porn can give the wrong perception of sex, which may lead to sexual dissatisfaction. 

When this happens, the confusion may lead a person to place the blame on their partner instead. In serious cases, it may even lower a person's sex drive or cause them to seek out riskier sexual behaviours.

3. It tends to showcase body types or features that lack diversity

While there is tasteful porn made by progressive women directors, porn is, unfortunately, still typically geared towards the male fantasy.

Bodies come in all shapes and sizes, including parts like the labia. However, porn doesn't always portray what bodies look like in reality, giving rise to body insecurities, particularly for young girls and women.

4. It has fictional storylines and sex that is performative

It's important to note that porn is entertainment (and again, often geared towards the male fantasy). The people you watch are entertainers and perform acts that are designed to look good in front of the camera.

The same goes with noises and sounds you hear, which are often exaggerated in porn. While sex can get loud in real life, you should be able to enjoy sex however you desire, and without the pressure of acting a certain way.

5. It gives teenagers and young adults a skewed view of sex

Due to the taboo nature of sex in society, many people's first introduction to sex is through porn. This means teenagers and young adults may expect certain acts to be more common than they actually are, or body parts to look a certain way, considering how porn categorises topics and themes.

With a porn-only education, once they get into their first real relationship or have sex for the first time, they may find themselves having to readjust to reality compared to what they have seen online.

6. It just isn't real!

The thing is, porn is accessible, and it's not going away, nor are people going to stop watching it. However, your go-to place for sexual education shouldn't be from porn, because it's quite simply not real.

It won't do you, your partner, or your sex life justice by learning from a fantasy representation, as it doesn't truly prepare you for what to expect when you get into bed with someone, from a safety aspect to expectations while doing the deed. On top of that, while sex can be purely physical, there are emotional aspects to consider too.

At the end of the day, while porn can serve as entertainment, it does not represent real sex lives, nor is it a reliable form of sexual education.

This is where Durex wants to help by empowering you to make the right decisions for yourself through its Come Together campaign.

Durex wants to normalise the conversation around sex through proper information, products, and a culture of open communication.

With that in mind, it has kickstarted its latest campaign back in August to bring the message alive with initiatives that include workshops at higher institutions, an A-Z pleasure guide and sticker pack that helps couples learn more about getting intimate together safely´╗┐, as well as a safe space for people to ask questions about sex.

In December, Durex is continuing the campaign of spreading safe sex education by hitting popular spots in the Klang Valley

From 26 to 30 December, the Durex Come Together Roving Truck will stop by high-traffic locations to spread safe sex education. ´╗┐

At the selected spots, you'll not only be able to learn about Durex's range of products and how to choose the right ones to meet your needs, but also enjoy live music, drinks, and games, so don't miss out!

Here's where you can find the roving trucks:

Keen on joining the fun? Mark your calendars for the Durex roving truck, which will be hitting places around the Klang Valley this December!

If you'd like to stay updated on more Durex initiatives, visit its Facebook page or Instagram. You can find out more about the Come Together campaign here

Educate yourself and learn more about sexual health: